Skip Navigation Links
Conference Agenda
Conference Photos
Conference Presentations
Keynote Speakers
Multimedia

 Conference Agenda  

The ATE Conference Program (PDF) is now available!

 

Wednesday  l  Thursday  l  Friday

 

Wednesday, October 23

PRECONFERENCE ACTIVITIES

10:00 am – 8:00 pm      
Conference Registration
West Conference Foyer

10:00 am – 7:30 pm    
Internet Café and Hot Spot

Executive

1:00 – 5:00 pm            
Workshop A: Getting Started 

Advance Registration and Ticket Required
Palladian

David Campbell, Program Director, National Science Foundation, VA
Elaine Craft, Director, SC ATE Center of Excellence, SC
Dennis Faber, Co-Principal Investigator, Mentor-Connect, MD
LeVar Rashawn Farrior, Grants and Agreement Specialist, Division of Grants and Agreements, National 
Science Foundation, VA
Arlen Gullickson, Co-Principal Investigator, EvaluATE, MI
Jason Burkhardt, Data Architect, EvaluATE, MI
Corey Smith, Data Analyst, EvaluATE, MI

This workshop is recommended for all principal investigators, co-principal investigators, and other team members involved in newly awarded projects and centers in FY13. Others who may find the workshop useful include new awardees in FY12 and other project personnel from prior years who have recently become involved in ATE projects and centers. The workshop will be divided into three parts: (1) ATE Program Issues. Topics to be covered include reporting requirements such as annual and final reports, working with NSF program officers, changes in project personnel or scope, data collection, FastLane and other reporting systems, use of Advisory Boards and National Visiting Committees, preparing project highlights for NSF and others, Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), and many other relevant topics. (2) Financial Management and Grant Management Issues. This section will focus on financial accounting issues and discuss in detail problems often seen in monitoring visits such as participant support, time and effort accounting, subawardees, record keeping, changes in scope, overload, and use of consultants. (3) Evaluation. This segment will address building in evaluation from the start of your project or center. The ATE program conducts an annual survey of all projects and centers that have been active for more than one year. Additional evaluation topics to be addressed include, but are not limited to, evaluation design, methods and instrumentation, resources for learning about productive evaluation, the roles of internal and external evaluators, and evaluation challenges. 

1:00 – 5:00 pm            
Workshop B: Advancing Innovation and Disseminating Impact: How to Spread the Word
Advance Registration and Ticket Required
Congressional
 
Elaine Johnson, Executive Director and PI, Bio-Link, City College of San Francisco, CA
Sandra Porter, Co-Principal Investigator, Bio-Link, CA
Linnea Fletcher, Co-Principal Investigator, Bio-Link, Austin Community College, TX
Deb Newberry, Director and PI, Nano-Link, Dakota County Community College, MN
Jennifer Newsted, Student Blogger, University of Nevada – Las Vegas, NV


Do the results of your project simply get filed away at NSF?  Does your students’ work disappear after the funding period ends? All too often, the lessons learned from a project are never shared with the larger community.  Publishing your work provides a way to increase the broader impacts of your project and help others build on your findings. You have already done the work, so why not leverage it? Publishing can bring numerous benefits for your project, your partners, your institution, and the ATE program.  Multiple people can also participate in the publishing process.  Having students blog or write papers helps them learn and publicizes your work. Publishing increases your credibility, validates your work, increases project visibility, provides more opportunities for future collaborations, and increases your chances of future funding.  Participants in this interactive session, will learn about informal (blogs, newsletters) and formal (peer-reviewed journal articles) opportunities for publishing, matching the audience with the type of publication, and best practices for different forms of publishing. The presenters have published in a variety of formats; have served as writers and editors for blogs, and as reviewers for journals; and have experience with student bloggers.

1:00 – 4:00 pm            
Workshop C: Follow the Money: Strategies for Leveraging ATE Grant Funding
Advance Registration and Ticket Required
Diplomat


Ann Beheler, Principal Investigator, Regional Convergence Technology Center, Collin College, TX
Patricia Dombrowski, Director, Life Science Informatics Center, Bellevue College, WA
Bob Feldmaier, Director, Center for Advanced Automotive Technology, Macomb Community College, MI
Anand Gramopadhye, Associate Vice President, Workforce Development, Clemson University, SC
Monica Pfarr, Corporate Director, Workforce Development, American Welding Society Foundation, FL


This session will encourage and empower participants with the tools to build on NSF support by discussing the practical considerations for vetting other private, state, and federal funding opportunities.  Participants will discuss the legal, ethical, and political ramifications of grant integration in a single area and will work on individual case studies, including garnering on-campus buy-in and industry partnerships.

1:00 – 4:00 pm            
Workshop D: Increasing Your Web and Social Media Impact
Advance Registration and Ticket Required
Hampton

Edward Almasy, Co-PI, ATE Central, WI
Edgar Troudt, Co-PI, Student Entrepreneurs Video Project, NY
Gordon Snyder, Executive Director and PI, ICT Center, Springfield Community and Technical College, MA


In this interactive session, participants will learn about tools and techniques for increasing the effectiveness and impact of their web site and social media channels, and have the opportunity to discuss what has and hasn't worked for them and how best to employ those tools and techniques within their environment to reach their target community.  Facilitated brainstorming in a roundtable format will be interspersed with group Q&A, with participants selecting the subjects most of interest to them. Topics covered will include web and social media analytics, usability testing, and content sharing mechanisms, as well as issues specific to each of the popular social media services (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube).  While this will be a non-technical workshop, technical concerns may be covered in breakout groups as needed.

1:00 – 4:00 pm            
Workshop E:  Strategies for Meaningful Interpretation of ATE Evaluation Data
Advance Registration and Ticket Required
Empire

Lori Wingate, Principal Investigator, EvaluATE, MI
Krystin Martens, Curriculum and Instruction Specialist, EvaluATE, MI

In this workshop, participants will review and discuss strategies for synthesizing and interpreting evaluation data to reach conclusions about an ATE project or center’s quality, progress, and/or impact.  Data interpretation typically requires one or more points of reference for comparison—whether internally-set targets, national benchmarks, other sites/organizations, past performance, or other information sources. Enhancing data interpretation helps projects avoid two common pitfalls in evaluation: (1) making conclusions that are not clearly linked to data and (2) reporting data without providing meaningful conclusions. The workshop will include demonstration and hands-on group work to apply strategies for data interpretation to reach conclusions and inform recommendations for project improvement.

3:30 – 6:00 pm            
Showcase I Set-up
Exhibit Hall

6:00 – 7:15 pm            
Opening Plenary Session

Regency Ballroom

V. Celeste Carter, Lead ATE Program Director, National Science Foundation, VA
Gail Schwartz, Senior Vice President for Innovative Learning and Student Success, American Association
  of Community Colleges, DC
Joan Ferrini-Mundy, Assistant Director, Directorate for Education and Human Resources, National Science Foundation, VA
Cora Marrett, Acting Director, National Science Foundation, VA

ATE @ 20: Reflecting on the Past, Reinvigorating the Future

The twentieth anniversary provides the perfect context to reflect on the how the ATE program began, what the program has achieved, and where the program might go from here.  Today, science, technology, math and engineering education, as well as our research and development enterprise, remain critical to our nation's competitiveness.  ATE
s proven model of success can play an important role in continuing to ensure that we equip current and next generations of science and engineering technicians with the latest skills and tools to compete in the global marketplace.

Keynote Speakers: 
Rick Stephens, Retired Vice President for Human Resources and Administration, Boeing Corporation
The Honorable David E. Price, United States House of Representatives


7:30 – 9:45 pm          
Showcase I and Welcome Reception
Exhibit Hall

9:45 – 10:30 pm        
Showcase I Breakdown
Exhibit Hall

 

Thursday, October 24

7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Conference Registration
West Conference Foyer

7:00 am – 6:00 pm      
Internet Café and Hot Spot
Executive

7:30 – 8:45 am            
Showcase II Set-up
Exhibit Hall

7:30 – 8:45 am
Continental Breakfast
Regency

7:30 – 8:45 am            
ATE Student/Alumni Recognition Breakfast (By invitation only)
Hampton

7:45 – 8:45 am            
Breakfast Roundtables
Ambassador

9:00 – 10:15 am
Plenary Session
Regency

V. Celeste Carter, Lead ATE Program Director, National Science Foundation, VA
Susan Singer, Deputy Director, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation, VA

Technicians in the Workforce – Celebrating Student Leadership and Success

This plenary session focuses on the conference theme of ATE@20: Advancing Innovation and Sustaining Success, and highlights STEM technicians from their student beginnings to their value and impact as employees in the workplace.  Hear directly from industry employers and recent ATE program graduates about how the ATE program helps students transition into the workplace; the benefits to employers of hiring ATE-prepared graduates; and ATE’s role in preparing students to be leaders in advancing the U.S. STEM workforce and our nation’s competitiveness.

Facilitator:  Moira Gunn, Host, TechNation and Biotech Nation, National Public Radio, CA

Panelists:
Johann Garcia, Junior Health Physics Technician, Bartlett Nuclear, FL
Keqin Gregg, Genetic Testing Lab Manager, Genotox Laboratories, TX
Wenjing Guo, Analyst I, Genotox Laboratories, TX
Jerry W. Hiatt, Chief Technical Officer, BHI Energy, MA
Justin Patten, Operations Manager, Hysitron, Inc., MN
Bryant Lekander, Quality Assurance Technician, Hysitron, Inc., MN

10:15 – 10:30 am
Refreshment Break
Diplomat, Ambassador, and Empire Foyers

10:30 – 11:45 am        
Concurrent Sessions

Session 1:  Industry Voices – What Industry Wants from Graduates to Hire Them and Keep Them?Ambassador

Werner Eikenbusch, Manager, Apprentice and Associate Training, BMW Manufacturing Corporation, SC
Matt Glover, Director of Global IT, AMX, TX
Patricia A. Shugart, Chief Operating Officer, Carolina Liquid Chemistries Corporation, NC
Moderator: Ann Beheler, Principal Investigator, Regional Convergence Technology Center,
  Collin College, TX

Hear from a diverse group of business and industry leaders involved with the ATE program regarding their impressions of the impact of ATE on the workforce and the skills they wish to see in our graduates.  Panelists will also discuss current job prospects; issues surrounding diversity in hiring practices; the value of certificates, degrees, and industry recognized certifications; and the behaviors that are necessary to keep a job once it is obtained.  There will be sufficient time devoted to a question and answer period with the audience.

Session 2: Envisioning ATE@30: The Community College Role in the STEM Economy
Diplomat

Elaine Craft, Director, SC ATE Center, Florence-Darlington Community College, SC
Jonathan Rothwell, Senior Research Associate and Associate Fellow, The Brookings Institution, DC
Louis Soares, Vice President, Policy, Research and Strategy, American Council on Education, DC
Moderator:  Kent Phillippe, Associate Vice President, Research, and Student Success, American
   Association of Community Colleges, DC

Where is the STEM workforce for tomorrow being educated?  According to a recent Brookings Institute report on The Hidden STEM Economy, 50% of STEM jobs do not require a bachelor’s degree.  This panel will address current and future trends in STEM occupations and employment, shifts in higher education and the changing models of post-secondary degrees, and the challenges and issues that community colleges will need to address in preparing future STEM technicians.  Key leaders in higher education, public policy and research, and STEM technician education will discuss the future of U.S. higher education given our shifting economy and changing educational landscape—and its impact on STEM.

Session 3: STEMMING the Marginalized Tide: Meeting Underrepresented Learners
Where They Live
Palladian

Brian J. Ketz, Executive Officer, Veterans’ Employment & Training Service (VETS), U.S. Department of Labor, DC
Terrance R. Campbell, Deputy Director, YOUR Center, MI
Moderators:  Deb Newberry, Director and PI, Nano-Link, Dakota County Community College, MN
Patricia Dombrowski, Executive Director, Health eWorkforce Consortium, Bellevue College, WA  

The opportunity to learn from, inspire, and serve the oncoming wave of diverse STEM learners and technicians is an exhilarating challenge for community colleges.  Leadership from veterans, students of color, indigenous communities, youth living in poverty, and learners with cognitive and physical impairments is needed.  This session focuses on practical steps to link with faith based and veterans’ organizations.  A session goal is to foster an open exchange with experts in these fields and other participants, to assist development of localized scenarios and strong projects.

Session 4: Emerging Technologies Lightning Round
Empire 

Kevin Cooper, Director, RC-NET, Indian River State College, FL
Marilyn Barger, PI and Executive Director, FLATE, Hillsborough Community College, FL
Dan Hull, PI and Executive Director, OP-TEC, TX
Gordon Snyder, PI and Executive Director, ICT Center, Springfield Community and Technical
  College, MA
Sandra Porter, Co-PI, Bio-Link, WA
Michael Lesiecki , PI, Executive Director, MATEC, Maricopa Community Colleges, AZ
Steve Kane, Managing Director, SpaceTEC, FL
Mel Cossette, PI, MatEd, Edmonds Community College, WA
Ken Patton, PI, RapidTech, Saddleback College, CA
Michelle Norgren, Director and PI, VESTA, Missouri State University, MO
Kristi Jean, Co-PI, Nano-Link, North Dakota State College, ND
Edgar Troudt, Co-PI, Student Entrepreneurs Video Project, Kingsborough Community College, NY
Moderator: Rachael Bower, PI, ATE Central, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI

Come join experts from the ATE community and learn about a range of new and emerging technologies in a fast-paced and informative lightning round session.  Ten presenters will each spend six minutes (and a few slides) providing participants with an overview of recent changes and innovations in their field— including photonics, information technology, vitacology, manufacturing, nanotechnology, biotechnology and much more.  A brief question and answer period will allow attendees to interact with presenters, mention trends or technologies from their own field, and expand on information provided during the more formal portion of the presentation.      

12:00 – 2:15 pm            
Showcase II and Lunch
Exhibit Hall

2:15 – 3:00 pm
Showcase II Breakdown
Exhibit Hall

2:30 – 3:45 p.m.        
Workshop and Discussion Sessions

 Workshop: Career Pathways: A Strategy for Building Tomorrow’s STEM Workforce
Track 1
Palladian

Peirce Hammond, Senior Advisor for Special Initiatives, OVAE, U.S. Department of Education, DC
Christopher Coro, Deputy Director, Adult Education and Literacy, OVAE, U.S. Department of
  Education, DC
Stan Koutstaal, Program Manager, Health Professional Opportunity Grants Program, U.S. Department
  of Health and Human Services, DC
Laura Messenger, Education Program Specialist, OVAE, U.S. Department of Education, DC
Andrala Walker, Workforce Analyst, ETA, U.S. Department of Labor, DC

As the need for postsecondary skills and knowledge presses individuals and employers, career pathway approaches are gaining attention. “Career pathways” are a strategy for youths and adults to acquire marketable skills and postsecondary credentials by aligning education, employment, and social services among public agencies and linking them to labor market trends and employer needs. In April, 2012 the Departments of Education (ED), Health and Human Services (HHS), and Labor (DOL) issued a joint letter encouraging states and local areas to adopt career pathway approaches to the delivery of employment, training, and education services and providing a common definition of career pathways and their essential components. ED, HHS, and DOL have formed an interagency working group to share information, identify opportunities for collaboration and technical assistance, and recommend strategies for adoption of career pathways approaches. This workshop will provide an overview of federal activities concerning career pathways, emphasizing their relevance to higher education and STEM.  Agency representatives will share promising practices and address ways to build high-quality programs for a variety of student populations, including disconnected youth, low-skilled adults, and dislocated workers.

Workshop: You Have Developed a Patentable Product on an ATE Grant.  Now What?
Track 1
Diplomat

Patricia E. Campbell, Director, School of Law, University of Maryland, MD
Dorian Grumet, Director, Licensee Relations and Reliance, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey,   NJ
Ned Israelsen, Partner, Knobbe Martens, CA
Moderator: Judith Fitzpatrick, Director of Quality Assurance Program,
Bergen Community College, NJ

Community colleges are joining their university counterparts in encouraging research and now are confronted with the issues surrounding patenting and commercialization. The university departments that handle these processes are costly and supported by a high volume of intellectual property. Community colleges are challenged to provide this. Consequently, inventors at community colleges and community colleges are short-changed. In this session, participants will hear from three distinguished patent professionals familiar with various university commercialization infrastructures who will lead a discussion on the various avenues that might be utilized by community colleges to support the patenting of inventions and the entrepreneurial spirit.

Discussion: The National Cyber League: Where Cybersecuirty is a Passion
Track 1
Calvert

Casey O'Brien, Director and PI, National CyberWatch Center, Prince George’s Community College, MD

Attendees will learn about the National Cyber League (NCL), a first-of-its-kind ongoing educational experiment in learning and gaming, where the students (AKA players) are co-creators and collaborators in building engaging, entertaining, measurable, and scalable methods of learning to enlist a new generation of cybersecurity professionals. This session will engage participants by telling a compelling story of how four ATE centers partnered in May 2011 to create an ongoing and virtual training ground for students to develop, practice, and validate their cybersecurity knowledge and skills using novel, next-generation, high-fidelity simulation environments.

Discussion: Transforming the Mindset of Secondary School Educators to Stimulate Student Choice of STEM Careers
Track 1
Embassy

John Reutter, Director of Planning and Resource Development, J.F. Drake State Technical College, AL

J. F. Drake State Community and Technical College has created the Summer Technology Institute (STI), a two-week experience for secondary school educators. The STI immerses participants in an 80-hour, postsecondary education experience covering a range of STEM topics and exposure to related careers. Participants are required to develop lesson plans and portfolios for use in their secondary school teaching and counseling jobs upon return to work in the fall. Testimonials produced by the participants at the end of the Institute provide evidence that participants undergo a significant transformation of opinion about STEM careers and community college educational pathways leading to those careers.

Discussion: In-Depth Review of the Development of a Manufacturing Career Pathway
Track 1
Senate

Karen White, Executive Director, 360º Manufacturing and Applied Engineering ATE Regional Center,
  Bemidji State University, MN

Participants will engage in a discussion on best practices for the development of a multiple college career pathway.  Project leaders will review how they developed the 360º Seamless Career Pathway encompassing machine tool, welding, electronics, and mechanical design. Lessons learned include how best to engage faculty in the development of a seamless career pathway from high school to bachelor-level. Meeting facilitation, worksheets, sample articulation agreements, and communication graphics will be shared and discussed. Participants will be asked to share how the best practices and lessons learned could be utilized by their project and field.

Workshop: The Competitive Edge of Leadership: Gaining/Using/Sharing Knowledge of What Works in Technician Education
Track 2
Empire

Dennis Faber, Co-PI, Mentor-Connect Project, MD
Tressa Gardner, Program Manager and Co-PI, Florence-Darlington Technical College, SC
Shawn Payne
, Mechatronics Coordinator, Owensboro Community and Technical College, KY
Liesel Ritchie, Assistant Director for Research, University of Colorado, CO
Moderator: Elaine Craft, SC ATE Director, Florence-Darlington Technical College, SC

Leaders know that knowledge is power. Learn how to gain/use/and share powerful knowledge through mentoring to inform effective practice, engage STEM students, and overcome obstacles. Learn about a new way that relevant research is being brought to the doorstep of technician educators.  Explore ways you can use research findings to be more successful in your work and to prepare competitive grant proposals. Review options to grow as a leader by mentoring within the ATE Program and sharing information/research findings from your project or Center work.

Discussion: What Can ATE PIs and Co-PIs Do to Proactively Broaden Impacts and Recruit Women to STEM?
Track 2
Congressional A

Donna L. Milgram, Executive Director, IWITTS, CA

Find out what your ATE project or center can do to meet NSF’s broader impacts requirements and increase diversity in your STEM programs.  Donna Milgram, PI of the CalWomenTech Scale-Up Project, will share concrete strategies that have worked to increase the number of female students in STEM programs at ATE sites using a Women in STEM Leadership Team model. Attendees will then have an opportunity to share experiences, learn what strategies have been successful for other programs, and brainstorm strategies to take back to their projects/centers that can be implemented right away.

Discussion: Beyond the Classroom Walls
Track 2
Forum

Cathryn Balas, Co-PI, Clark State Community College, OH
Dan Heighton, PI and Professor, Computer Networking-Cybersecurity, Clark State Community
College, OH

This discussion session will focus on the effective use of faculty extern/student intern teams for faculty development. Presenters will demonstrate how faculty have become more engaged in the business community and the impact of the team approach on faculty and students. This promising model has benefits to all the parties involved—small businesses gain resources through faculty involvement; students experience teamwork in a business setting far beyond a single internship model; and faculty develop new, hands-on approaches to teaching and mentoring students. Participants will be challenged to identify methods they can use to replicate the model.

Workshop: Using Universal Design Principles to Improve Student Learning and Success
Track 3
Congressional B

Donna Lange, Center Director, DeafTEC, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY
Gary Long, Co-PI, DeafTEC, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY
Myra Pelz, Co-PI, DeafTEC, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY


Universal design in education is an approach to designing course instruction, materials, and content to benefit people of all learning styles. Modifications for students, especially for those with disabilities, are built into the curriculum, not merely added later on as needs arise. During this presentation, participants will experience what it is like to be a deaf student in a class followed by a discussion on the challenges deaf students face in the classroom and Universal Design principles that could be used to improve the instruction and learning not only for the deaf student but for all students in the class.

Workshop: All for One: Meeting the Grant Mission with Multiple Partners
Track 4
Ambassador

Jodi Creasap-Gee, State Coordinator, VESTA, Kent State University, OH
Michelle Norgren, Director and PI, VESTA, Missouri State University, MO
Scott Kohl, Campus Director, VESTA, Highland Community College, KS
Moderator: Michael Gau, Co-PI, VESTA, Northeast Iowa Community College, IA

Coordinating a large number of partners and assuring that all grant goals and objectives are met can be daunting even to the most seasoned grant coordinator. VESTA will provide an overview of strategies utilized by this national ATE center to assure full participation by all partners, that all grant goals and objectives are met, and that all expenditures are matched to grant objectives. Reporting procedures and communication tools including a grant activity grid, quarterly activity report form, Saba Centra, BlackBoard, and the VESTA web site will be shared with the participants.


Workshop: Mechatronics: The Foundation for Manufacturing, Supply Chain Technology, and Other Critical Industries
Track 6
Hampton

Ned David Young, Co-PI, The National Center for Supply Chain Technology Education, OH
Marilyn Barger, Executive Director, FLATE, FL

Mechatronics is the integrated study of mechanical mechanisms, electronics, robotics, pneumatics, hydraulics and automated control systems. The integration of these traditionally separate disciplines provides significant opportunities for developing multi-skilled technicians possessing troubleshooting/maintenance skills that can be applied to emerging industrial fields. We will highlight two sectors that require mechatronics technicians: manufacturing and supply chain technology. The session will engage participants with a discussion of additional industry sectors requiring mechatronics, and how colleges can provide both a strong mechatronics curriculum and career awareness of diverse applications to numerous industries that have demonstrated critical need for multi-skilled technicians in this enabling technology.

Workshop: Working with the NSF’s SBIR Program to Benefit Your College and Support Small Business in Your Community
Track 6
Regency

Dave Brown, Program Director, National Science Foundation, VA
Ben Schrag,
Program Director, National Science Foundation, VA
Moderator: Sandra G. Porter, President, Digital World Biology, WA

Businesses that are funded by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program at the National Science Foundation are eligible for supplemental funding that can benefit community colleges, instructors and students. These businesses are natural allies and partners for members of the ATE community. In this session, we will describe the SBIR program and its goals, describe the supplements, and describe how to find and contact the companies that have been funded in your area and field. We will discuss ways to connect with these companies before they apply for SBIR funding and how you can help them with SBIR grants.

Discussion: Exploring In-Demand Skills from Employer Job Postings Metadata
Track 6
Cabinet

Elaine Johnson, Executive Director and PI, Bio-Link, CA
Levi Thiele, Research Director, AIM Institute, NE

Because the technology needs of business and industry are always changing, we as educators are challenged to keep students focused on the right skills to meet these changing needs. Industry engagement models, employers’ job postings, and region specific labor market analyses are some examples of the tools that community colleges can utilize in order to identify current job market needs and adapt their curriculum as needed. This session will facilitate a discussion focused on the strategies that educators can use to bring the most relevant learning experiences to our students. 

Discussion: Training Water Technicians for Business and Industry 
Track 6
Council

Ellen Kabat Lensch, PI, Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), Eastern
  Iowa Community Colleges, IA
Kirk Laflin,
Executive Director, Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE), ME

ATEEC and PETE present results of the 2013 national forum and report, Defining Water Management. Industry representatives from across the country defined the water field, clarified occupational categories, and listed technician occupations and job functions. ATEEC plans to conduct a series of regional Water Management Conversation forums, gathering stakeholders from business/industry, government, non-profits, and education. These forums and resulting reports will expand on the national report to form a realistic regional snapshot of the current/future water technician workforce, with particular emphasis on translating business/industry needs to education. Discussion will gather input on conducting the Water Management Conversation forums to support regional needs.

Workshop: International Collaboration: Benefits and Lessons Learned
Track 7
Governors

Karen Wosczyna Birch, Executive Director, RCGNM, Connecticut Community Technical College System, CT
Mary Slowinski, Faculty and Online Learning Coordinator, CREATE, CA 
Ken Walz, Renewable Energy Project Director, Madison Area Technical College, WI

In the past year, two regional ATE Centers were funded by NSF programs to conduct two different international learning programs, one focused on students in manufacturing (RCGNM) and one focused on faculty teaching renewable energy (CREATE).  Join this session to learn how RCGNM planned and administered a student-centered trip to Germany, how CREATE designed activities to deepen the learning experience for faculty visiting technical colleges in Australia and New Zealand, and hear first-hand accounts from a faculty and student about the participants’ experiences.

4:00 – 5:15 p.m.           
Workshop and Discussion Sessions

Discussion: Nationwide Opportunities for STEM Technicians
Track 1
Senate

Greg Kepner, Department Chair, Regional Economic Advancement, Indian Hills Community College, IA

Indian Hills Community College (IHCC) has a unique approach to recruitment and job placement for STEM technicians with an AAS degree in Laser/Electro-optics Technology. IHCC recruits students and places graduates regionally and all across the nation. Graduate job placement is nearly always 100% and there are often 4-6 job opportunities per graduate. Some may consider this a brain drain and others consider it an opportunity for students to enter high wage, high demand, high skill, STEM technician careers.

Discussion: How Do I Help My College Transform Its Infrastructure to Support Entrepreneurial Endeavors?
Track 1
Congressional A

Vivian Ngan-Winward, Director, Biomanufacturing Program, Salt Lake Community College, UT
Judith Fitzpatrick, Director, Quality Assurance Program, Bergen Community College, NJ

This session is designed to allow participants to share strategies and best practices that enable success and sustainability of entrepreneurial projects. A dialogue between ATE project personnel that have spawned (or are planning) such entrepreneurial projects is anticipated. Topics may include issues such as appreciation of student benefits; institutional barriers; available facilities; effective institutional response to project needs; institutional impacts of project success; and sustainability potential/plans. Participants will choose a topic to discuss with other interested parties, and discussions will be shared with the whole group.

Discussion: Overview of an Engineering Pathway Guide with Strategies for Teaching, Learning, and Student Support
Track 1
Embassy

Verlyn Fick, Vice President Instruction and Provost, Cochise College, AZ 
Caroline VanIngen-Dunn, Manager, STEM Pathways,
Science Foundation Arizona (SFAz), AZ
Chad Laux, Assistant Professor, Technology, Leadership, and Innovation, Purdue University, IN
Vearl Turnpaugh, Assistant Vice President, Career and Technical Programs, Ivy Tech Community
  College, IN


Anchored by community colleges and led by local business, SFAz’s engineering pathway model aligns K-12 outreach and career exploration; foundational knowledge and skills, and certificate and degree programs.  Delivered as a guide, the pathway model provides strategies for teaching, learning, and student support.  Examples include an Early College Academy from Cochise College and an engineering technology pathway between Ivy Tech and Purdue. 
Participants will compare their pathways, identify what is in place, where there are gaps, and what is needed for improvement. Outcomes will inform participants’ pathway development and help optimize the Engineering Pathways Guide as an online resource. 

Workshop: Creating Classroom Transformations in STEM Education
Track 2
Diplomat

Claudia J. Morrell, Chief Operating Officer, NAPE, PA
Carolyn Parker, Assistant Professor, School of Education, The Johns Hopkins University, MD


Faculty in the innovative professional development program, Micromessaging to Reach and Teach Every Student, use the power of micromessages (small and often subtle, yet powerful messages) to improve classroom culture and pedagogy. A team of equity and STEM experts, researchers, and practitioners across disciplines and among education, business, government, and non-profit communities developed the program to provide educators with a process for using research-based strategies and effective practices to address the unique needs of diverse students. The year-long training has demonstrated a statistically significant impact on faculty practice (treatment vs. control groups) leading to improved STEM student academic outcomes.

Workshop:  Best Practices for Engaging and Inspiring Secondary Teachers as Emerging Technology Leaders
Track 2
Governors

Maureen A. Devery, Outreach Coordinator, North Seattle Community College, WA
Dianne McKee, Project Coordinator, Maricopa Community Colleges, AZ
Jeannette R. Shaffer, Project Coordinator, Maricopa Community Colleges, AZ

Reaching the next generation of ATE program graduates is easier with strong partnerships with high school teachers. In this session, participants will engage with other ATE programs to share best practices, challenges, and experiences in creating and carrying out face-to-face and online professional development workshops for high school educators. Participants will explore how fostering relationships with participants can lead to strong and innovative leadership that can help bring emerging technologies into existing classrooms as well as create new technology courses. Successful models of professional development will also be shared and discussed.

Workshop: Getting Started with PBL: Strategies, Resources, and Lessons Learned
Track 3
Palladian

Nicholas Massa, Professor, Laser Electro-Optics Technology, Springfield Technical Community College, MA
Jane Ostrander, PI, Destination PBL project, Truckee Meadows Community College, Reno, NV

PBL challenges students to solve real-world problems and acquire professional skills needed for success in the 21st century workplace. Transforming classrooms to PBL demands new classroom management and instructional skills, curriculum materials, and student approaches to learning. In this interactive session, instructors who have created PBL programs and classrooms and ATE projects and centers that have created resources and provided support for PBL faculty will host roundtable discussions to share their processes, available resources, and lessons learned. Participants will select two roundtable discussions to join, share resources, and develop a plan of action for getting started with PBL.

Workshop: Advancing Innovation in Technician Education: Flipping Classrooms and Integrating Open Learning Resources
Track 3
Ambassador

Kris K. Frady, Research Associate,Clemson University, SC
Kapil Chalil Madathil, Technology Lead, Clemson University, SC
Danine Tomlin, Executive Director, AMTEC, KY
Moderator: Walter Barlow, Modularization and Curriculum Specialist, AMTEC, KY

This session showcases technical education models (AMTEC’s Mechatronic Maintenance Curriculum and CA2VES Advanced Manufacturing Curriculum) utilizing classroom flipping strategies and open learning resources supporting blended learning. Discussions will include promising practices for implementation at community/technical colleges, implications for other technical programs of study, a description of methods used to develop assessments and lessons aligned to validated industry skill standards, and organization of digital learning tools into a hybrid online lecture/face-to-face lab associate degree program and curriculum. Participants will experience digital learning tools, open learning resources, and reflective activities encouraging them to consider technology and open learning resources in their programs.

Discussion: If You Don’t Lecture – How Do You Teach? Options for Engagement, Collaboration, and Relevance in Technology Classrooms
Track 3
Forum

Erika Bowles, PI, Tacoma Community College, WA
Candyce Rennegarbe, UDL Project Director, Tacoma Community College, WA

Less lecture and more classroom interaction is a desirable goal - but how do you achieve this in technology classrooms where lecturing is the norm? Universal Design for Learning (UDL) provides a framework for interactive learning through focus on learning accessibility for all students. Presenters will review the UDL model, review UDL applications in a current NSF/other projects, then lead a discussion in which participants describe their best practices in interactive UDL-based learning. Takeaways will include descriptions of successful UDL classroom implementations, best practices in interactive learning, and interactive learning tools/resources, including access to a UDL best practices database.

Discussion: Innovations in Dual Enrollment
Track 3
Congressional B

Donna Lange, Center Director, DeafTEC, Rochester Institute of Technology, NY
Michael Staley, Dean, School of Engineering, Design, and Construction, Seminole State College, FL

This session will discuss two innovative strategies:  a unique co-taught dual enrollment growth strategy and a national dual-credit model delivered across the country.  The co-taught methodology overcomes common obstacles to delivering dual enrollment courses locally, thereby building a more robust pipeline of full-time students from the high schools.  The national model (Project Fast Forward) has developed, over the past seven years, a host of best practices for implementing these programs across state lines.  While both projects have focused specifically on STEM programs, Project Fast Forward has concentrated on delivering these courses for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. 

Discussion: Determining Readiness for Scalability and Sustainability – How Do You Know and How Can You Prepare?
Track 4
Calvert

Deborah Boisvert, PI, BATEC, University of Massachusetts-Boston, MA
Elaine Johnson, Executive Director and PI, Bio-Link, CA
David McNeel, Senior Consultant, University of Massachusetts-Boston, MA

You have concluded a successful pilot of your project and are now considering next steps for scaling and sustaining it.  Some of the most important aspects of assessing a project’s success and preparing for scaling and sustainability go back to the design and plans for the project.  Participants will be challenged to consider their thoughts on determining and assessing project outcomes and readiness for scaling and sustainability and to share their views in dialogue with others. Concepts, processes, and tools that have been determined to aid in this success will be presented as well as examples and lessons learned of their use.

Workshop: ATE Targeted Research in Action: FLATE/PathTech and Fox Valley/METTE Partnerships to Improve Student Outcomes
Track 5
Regency

Allen Phelps, Senior Scientist, Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin, WI
Will Tyson, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of South Florida, FL
 
Lakshmi Jayaram, Visiting Instructor, Department of Sociology, University of South Florida, FL
Edward Fletcher, Assistant Professor, Department of Adult, Career, and Higher Education, University of South Florida, FL
Moderator: Patricia Frohrib, Vice President, Student and Community Development, Fox Valley Technical College, WI

PathTech (USF Sociology) and METTE (UW-Madison Education) each partner with local public two-year colleges to conduct targeted research on student outcomes using quantitative and qualitative methods.  Each study uses state longitudinal administrative data and student performance databases to uncover pathways into technician education programs, track student progress, and describe student outcomes.  These projects also conduct interviews and focus groups with technician education students, faculty, and administrators and other key informants from high schools and local industry.  In this session, PathTech and METTE investigators describe findings and conduct activities to illustrate ways of using targeted research findings to improve practice.

Workshop: Cultivating Effective Industry Partnerships for Long-Term Sustainability
Track 6
Empire

Brad Mason, Director, AMSEC, LLC, VA
Barbara Murray, SMART PI and Apprenticeship Related Instruction Director, SMART, Tidewater Community College, VA
Monica Pfarr, Corporate Director, Workforce Development, American Welding Society, OH
Moderator: Ed Smith, Associate Director, Industry Relations – Centers for Applied Competitive
  Technologies, San Diego City College, CA
     

Forging effective partnerships with industry leaders is key to achieving ATE program success. The SMART center has created a customizable model of industry partner engagement that has enabled the center to effectively develop a new career pathway for its industry, measure significant career awareness success, and cultivate a cadre of educators and industry leaders dedicated to advancing the center’s success. Attendees will hear from the SMART center's industry partners and ATE center partner Weld-Ed about the process of implementing proven principles to produce effective partnerships with industry professionals to ensure sustainability for your center or project.

Workshop: Understanding and Leveraging the USA Digital Fabrication Learning Community
Track 6
Hampton

James J. Janisse, PI, Digital Fabrication Learning Community, Fox Valley Technical College, WI
Michael Lesiecki, PI, MATEC, Maricopa Community Colleges, AZ
Moderator: Dale Walker, Director, Business and Industry Services, Fox Valley Technical College, WI

This session will describe the pilot USA Digital Fabrication Learning Community (DFLC) that leverages digital and personal fabrication’s proven enrichment of STEM competencies and attitudes with learners and educators, while driving Next Generation Manufacturing technician development. Special emphasis will be placed on the potential and opportunities for DFLC technologies and techniques to drive U.S. innovation, and economic and workforce development. Learn about the extensive resources and support now available and join the rapidly growing and global MIT Fab Lab community!

Discussion: Working with the Department of Labor to Develop a Competency Model
Track 6
Cabinet

Vince DiNoto, Dean of College and Systemic Initiatives, PI GeoTech Center, Jefferson Community
  and Technical College, KY
Ann Johnson, Associate Director and Co-PI, Jefferson Community and Technical College, KY

The discussion session will explore the work which has been accomplished in the development of the Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) for the Department of Labor (DoL) as well as updating of the model during the 2013 - 2014 academic year. The discussion will include examples of the outlines for model courses that have been developed based upon the previous GTCM.  Participants will explore how this competency based method can be used for course design, articulations, and certifications.

 

Friday, October 25

7:30 am –12:00 pm     
Conference Registration
West Conference Foyer

7:30 – 10:00 am
Internet Café and Hot Spot
West Conference Foyer

7:30 – 8:45 am            
Continental Breakfast
Regency Ballroom

7:30 – 8:45 am            
Showcase III Set-up
Exhibit Hall

7:45 – 8:45 am            
Breakfast Roundtables
Ambassador

9:00 – 10:15 am          
Plenary Session
Regency Ballroom

V. Celeste Carter, Lead ATE Program Director, National Science Foundation, VA
Richard Duschl, Division Director,
Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings,
  National Science Foundation, VA

The Next 20 Years: Technology Innovations and Global Opportunities

Keynote Speakers:
Carolyn Corbin, President, Center for the 21st Century
Jeff Wacker, Senior Fellow Emeritus, Hewlett-Packard/EDS


Every 40-50 years since the industrial revolution, technologies that drive world economies have shifted.  From water power to steam to electricity to oil, from railroads to automobiles, from steel to mass production, and most recently to information and telecommunications—each cycle has created enormous social and economic change presenting great opportunities for those prepared to take on the challenge. This plenary session features two premier futurists to discuss the technologies that are currently transforming the economy and defining the next generation of employment opportunities for all workers, including technicians; and the intersecting socio-economic trends that are transforming how we live and work. Speakers will discuss both the challenges and opportunities for educational institutions as they empower future STEM technicians.

10:15 – 12:30 pm        
Showcase III and Lunch
Exhibit Hall

12:30 – 1:15 pm          
Showcase III Breakdown
Exhibit Hall

12:45 – 3:00 pm          
ATE Center Directors Meeting
ATE Center Staff Only
Palladian

Home | Site Map | ©2014  American Association of Community Colleges
 One Dupont Circle, NW | Suite 410 | Washington, DC 20036 | Ph: 202.728.0200 | Fx: 202.833.2467
www.aacc21stcenturycenter.org | www.ccdaily.com | plus50.aacc.nche.edu  | www.theseedcenter.org