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Robin Sharma
Leadership Expert

Robin Sharma is the globally celebrated author of 15 international bestselling books on leadership including The Leader Who Had No Title, the phenomenal #1 blockbuster that is inspiring a movement around the idea that “Now, anyone - in any organization - can show Leadership." And “The organization that grows leaders at every level of the firm faster than their industry peers becomes undefeatable.”

Sharma’s work has been published in over 75 countries and in nearly 90 languages, making him one of the most widely read authors in the world. He shot to fame with The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari, which has topped international bestseller lists and sold over 5,000,000 copies. Robin is the founder of Sharma Leadership International Inc., a widely respected training firm with only one focus: helping people in organizations Lead Without a Title. Clients include many of the FORTUNE 500 including Microsoft, GE, NIKE, FedEx, HP, PwC and IBM. Organizations such as NASA, IMD Business School, Yale University and The Young President's Organization are also SLI clients. Robin is a former litigation lawyer who holds two law degrees including a Masters of Law (Dalhousie Law School).

Success Data on Robin Sharma

  • In an independent survey of over 22,000 business people, Robin was ranked in The Top 5 of the world's leadership experts along with Jack Welch, Jim Collins and John Maxwell. (Source: leadershipgurus.net)
  • Robin's books on Leadership and elite performance in business have sold over 10,000,000 copies in 75+ Countries.
  • Ranked #5 on Global Gurus’ World’s Top 30 Leadership Professionals for 2016 (source: globalgurus.org)
  • Speaking.com voted Robin one of The Top 5 Leadership Speakers in the world.
  • Robin's runaway bestseller The Leader Who Had No Title was the #1 Business book on amazon.com Robin's fans + endorsers include Nobel Prize winner Desmond Tutu, rock star Jon Bon Jovi, a member of The British Royal family and heads of state from around the world.

Robin's Mission Statement

“To help people and organizations around the world Lead Without a Title.”


Wes Moore
Youth advocate, Army combat veteran, promising business leader, and author

Moore graduated Phi Theta Kappa as a commissioned officer from Valley Forge Military College in 1998 and Phi Beta Kappa from Johns Hopkins University in 2001 with a bachelor’s degree in international relations. He completed an MLitt in international relations from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar in 2004. Moore was a paratrooper and captain in the United States Army, serving a combat tour of duty in Afghanistan with the elite 1st Brigade of the 82nd Airborne Division in 2005–2006. A White House Fellow from 2006–2007, Moore served as a special assistant to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Following his time at the White House, Moore became an investment professional in New York at Citigroup, focusing on global technology and alternative investments. In 2009 he was selected as an Asia Society Fellow. Moore was named one of Ebony magazine’s “Top 30 Leaders Under 30” for 2007 and Crain’s New York Business’ “40 Under 40 Rising Stars” in 2009. Moore’s first book, The Other Wes Moore, was published by Spiegel & Gray, an imprint of Random House, in late April 2010.

Wes Moore was born in 1978 and was three years old when his father, a respected radio and television host, died in front of him. His mother, hoping for a better future for her family, made great sacrifices to send Moore and his sisters to private school. Caught between two worlds—the affluence of his classmates and the struggles of his neighbors—Moore began to act out, succumbing to bad grades, suspensions, and delinquencies. Desperate to reverse his behavior, his mother sent him to military school in Pennsylvania. After trying to escape five times, Moore finally decided to stop railing against the system and become accountable for his actions. By graduation six years later, Moore was company commander overseeing 125 cadets.

On December 11, 2000, the Baltimore Sun ran an article about how Moore, despite his troubled childhood, had just received The Rhodes Scholarship. At the same time, the Sun was running stories —eventually more than 100 in all—about four African-American men who were arrested for the murder of an off-duty Baltimore police officer during an armed robbery. One of the men convicted was just two years older than Moore, lived in the same neighborhood, and in an uncanny turn, was also named Wes Moore. Moore wondered how two young men from the same city, who were around the same age, and even shared a name, could arrive at two completely different destinies. The juxtaposition between their lives, and the questions it raised about accountability, chance, fate and family, had a profound impact on Moore. He decided to write to the other Wes Moore, and much to his sur-prize, a month later he received a letter back. He visited the other Moore in prison over a dozen times, spoke with his family and friends, and discovered startling parallels between their lives: both had difficult childhoods, they were both fatherless, were having trouble in the classroom; they’d hung out on similar corners with similar crews, and had run into trouble with the police. Yet at each stage of their lives, at similar moments of decision, they would head down different paths towards astonishingly divergent destinies. Moore realized in their two stories was a much larger tale about the consequences of personal responsibility and the imperativeness of education and community for a generation of boys searching for their way.

Seeking to help other young people to redirect their lives, Moore is committed to being a positive influence and helping kids find the support they need to enact change. Pointing out that a high school student drops out every nine seconds, Moore says that public servants—the teachers, mentors and volunteers who work with our youth—are as imperative to our national standing and survival as are our armed forces. “Public service does not have to be an occupation,” he says, “but it must be a way of life.”


Jenna Bush Hager
Daughter of Former President, Author, and Editor-at-Large of Southern Living Magazine

Jenna Hager is a contributing correspondent on NBC's Today show and an editor-at-large for Southern Living magazine.

She is also the author of The New York Times best seller Ana's Story: A Journey of Hope, which she wrote after traveling to Latin America in 2006 as an intern with UNICEF. Ana's Story is based on the life of a 17-year-old single mother with HIV, who struggles to shield her child from the life she had of abuse and neglect.

Hager remains involved with UNICEF and is currently the chair of its Next Generation initiative, which is dedicated to reducing childhood deaths around the world.

Hager holds a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Texas at Austin. She is also co-author of the children's book Read All About It!

Hager is the daughter of former U.S. President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush. In 2008, she married Henry Hager. Jenna and Henry are the proud parents of their daughters, Margaret Laura "Mila" and Poppy Louise Hager.


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